Latest Entries »

Parkinson’s Law states that ‘work expands to fill the time available’. While strenuously denied by management consultants, bureaucrats and efficiency experts, the law is borne out by disinterested observation of any organization. The book goes far beyond its famous theorem, though. The author goes on to explain how to meet the most important people at a social gathering and why, as a matter of mathematical certainty, the time spent debating an issue is inversely proportional to its objective importance. Justly famous for more than forty years, Parkinson’s Law is at once a bracingly cynical primer on the reality of human organization, and an innoculation against the wilful optimism to which we as a species are prone.

From C. Northcote Parkinson’s THE LAW.

“Oppression, it has been said, either raises men into heroes or sinks them into slaves: And taxation, according to its magnitude and the mode in which it is imposed, either makes men industrious, enterprising and wealthy, or indolent, dispirited and impoverished….were it carried to any great height, or to 10, 15 or 20 per cent, it could generate the most barefaced prostitution of principle, and do much to sap that nice sense of honor which is the only sure foundation of national probity and virtue.”—J. R. McCulloch.

“I place economy among the first and most important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers to be feared…To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with public debt…We must make our choice between economy and liberty or profusion and servitude.

“…If we run into such debts, we must be taxed in our meat and drink, in our necessities and comforts, in our labor and in our amusements…If we can prevent the Government from wasting the labor of the people, under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.”—Thomas Jefferson.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C._Northcote_Parkinson

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkinson%27s_law

C. Northcote Parkinson Quotes

The chief product of an automated society is a widespread and deepening sense of boredom.

The man whose life is devoted to paperwork has lost the initiative. He is dealing with things that are brought to his notice, having ceased to notice anything for himself.

Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.

Expansion means complexity and complexity decay.

Expenditures rise to meet income.

The Law of Triviality… briefly stated, it means that the time spent on any item of the agenda will be in inverse proportion to the sum involved.

The chief product of an automated society is a widespread and deepening sense of boredom.

The smaller the function, the greater the management.

A committee is organic rather than mechanical in its nature: it is not a structure but a plant. It takes root and grows, it flowers, wilts, and dies, scattering the seed from which other committees will bloom in their turn.

Time spent on any item of the agenda will be in inverse proportion to the sum involved.

When any organizational entity expands beyond 21 members, the real power will be in some smaller body.

It is better to be a has-been than a never-was.

In politics people give you what they think you deserve and deny you what they think you want.

Make the people sovereign and the poor will use the machinery of government to dispossess the rich.

Perfection of planned layout is achieved only by institutions on the point of collapse.

The man who is denied the opportunity of taking decisions of importance begins to regard as important the decisions he is allowed to take.

Men enter local politics solely as a result of being unhappily married

Matthew Marquardt
AttachmentsAug 25 (12 days ago)

to me, matthew, info
Dear Reg,

Thank you for confirming your attendance at our City Council Ward 20 Candidates’ Forum on Sunday, September 7, at St Patrick’s Church at 131 McCaul Street.

The forum will take place in our St John Neumann Hall, beginning at 1 PM. A light lunch will be provided.

As promised in our invitation, we have attached a list of questions for you to consider in advance. Please note that, depending upon the number of candidates who appear (so far, seven have confirmed their attendance), we likely will not be able to get to all the questions in the allotted time. In any case, we will work from a priority list.

Each candidate will be asked to respond, in turn, and to limit her/his response for each question to one minute or less. This limit will be enforced, so that the audience has an equal opportunity to hear each candidate’s thoughts.

As previously mentioned, we are inviting all interested members of the public to attend, along with the press. The Forum is intended to serve all people of good will, and not just Catholics.

We look forward to meeting you!

Matthew
Matthew Marquardt
Catholic Voice
matthew@CatholicVoice.ca

 

Matthew,

Looking over your questionnaire I see that it meets the definition of the word “sin.” That is, it misses the mark.

I began studying the Wilhelm/Baynes edition of THE I CHING in 1968.

In 1970 while travelling from Toronto to Los Angeles by bus at the invitation of a friend I read a unique translation of the New Testament I had found at my uncle’s place in Ottawa. He had studied to be a priest before he entered the Civil Service where he had risen to become Director General of Public Works Canada which is the highest post in the land.

Here is Hexagram 48 0f THE I CHING:

48. Ching / The Well

above K’AN THE ABYSMAL, WATER
below SUN THE GENTLE, WIND, WOOD

Wood is below, water above. The wood goes down into the earth to bring up water. The image derives from the pole-and-bucket well of ancient China.
The wood represents not the buckets, which in ancient times were made of clay, but rather the wooden poles by which the water is hauled up from the
well. The image also refers to the world of plants, which lift water out of the earth by means of their fibers. The well from which water is drawn conveys the further idea of an inexhaustible dispensing of nourishment.

THE JUDGMENT

THE WELL. The town may be changed,
But the well cannot be changed.
It neither decreases nor increases.
They come and go and draw from the well.
If one gets down almost to the water
And the rope does not go all the way,
Or the jug breaks, it brings misfortune.

In ancient China the capital cities were sometimes moved, partly for the sake of more favorable location, partly because of a change in dynasties. The style
of architecture changed in the course of centuries, but the shape of the well has remained the same from ancient times to this day. Thus the well is the  symbol of that social structure which, evolved by mankind in meeting its most primitive needs, is independent of all political forms. Political
structures change, as do nations, but the life of man with its needs remains eternally the same-this cannot be changed. Life is also inexhaustible. It grows
neither less not more; it exists for one and for all. The generations come and go, and all enjoy life in its inexhaustible abundance. However, there are two prerequisites for a satisfactory political or social organization of mankind. We must go down to the very foundations of life. For any merely superficial ordering of life that leaves its deepest needs unsatisfied is as ineffectual as if no attempt at order had ever been made.  Carelessness-by which the jug is broken-is also disastrous. If for instance the military defense of a state is carried to such excess that it provokes wars by which the power of the state is annihilated, this is a breaking of the jug.

This hexagram applies also to the individual. However men may differ in disposition and in education, the foundations of human nature are the same
in everyone. And every human being can draw in the course of his education from the inexhaustible wellspring of the divine in man’s nature. But here likewise two dangers threaten: a man may fail in his education to penetrate to the real roots of humanity and remain fixed in convention-a partial education of this sort is as bad as none- or he may suddenly collapse and neglect his self-development.

If one gets down almost to the water
And the rope does not go all the way,
Or the jug breaks, it brings misfortune.

But here likewise two dangers threaten: a man may fail in his education to penetrate to the real roots of humanity and remain fixed in convention-a partial education of this sort is as bad as none- or he may suddenly collapse and neglect his self-development.

In the gospels when Jesus is asked by someone, “Be my teacher,” he replies, “You have one teacher. God.”

John, in his first letter, writes, “You have no need that any man should teach you for the spirit with which you are anointed is your teacher>”

So right away we have a problem for either we trust God as our teacher or we do not.

In my case, I do.

In your case, from your questionnaire, clearly you do not.

The answer to all your questions is simple enough: In all things be guided by Christ.

What I found interesting is that the teachings of THE I CHING are almost identical to those of Christ.

The result was that at twenty-two I chose to live a life based entirely on faith. The result has been an extraordinary life.

The answer to 1 a & b from THE I CHING is that the superior man is always on the side of the poor and the downtrodden. The answer from THE GOSPELS is the same.

2. Stewardship of office. Well, the best answer comes from ACTS where Peter seeing the unbaptized Greeks receive the gift of the Holy Spirit states, “I see that the Lord is not a respecter of person but that in all lands those who love God and do good are loved by God.” The steward is there to serve everyone not just the ones that belong to his/her clique or group.

As for answerable, in the end we are all answerable to God. I have a history of standing up to bullies. That will continue. I also have a history of standing up ALONE against bullies which continues to this moment.

3. Rights and Responsibilities Society and The Individual.

Well, one thing I know is that there are two kinds of people. There are those who see themselves as their brother’s keeper and there are those who do not.

However, both THE I CHING and THE GOSPELS teach that if we trust in men we do so at our peril. Forty years of experiences teaches me this is true. I expect NOTHING from others except excuses. As an individual I expect nothing from society but trouble.

4. Rights and Responsibilites: Transparency in Government.

For over twenty years I have had a small number of people actively filing complaints against me to the city. They are able to stay hidden. I’d like to change that.

5. Cultural growth.

Laura Lind, writing in EYE Weekly, stated, “Reg Hartt’s Cineforum is everything Jane Jacobs wrote about.” She meant that if the fullest sense of the word. I have done something many see as culturally valuable while fighting a bureaucracy that, since 1968, has not. In fact, if you go to my website you will find many voices speaking high praise of a voice that others have done their best to silence. I am not alone. Those who are part of the real culture are never those who are publicly approved. Scot Joplin while not Canadian serves as an example. He was America’s first original composer but he was not allowed to join the American Federation of Musicians as his music was whore house music.

For decades THE CATHOLIC LEGION OF DECENCY imposed a moral code on motion picture production which can best be described as fouler than any truth it prohibited.
6. Planning and Economic Development.

Well, Jane Jacobs in her books warns us against planners. Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof. John Lennon wrote, “Life is what happens while you are busy making plans.” THE I CHING teaches that to learn to live with little during times of plenty prepares us for times of want. I have been doing that for forty years. What we call economic development is really the selling of our souls.

7 & 8, 9: Economic Justice:

The best answer comes from Robbie Burns:  Morality, thou deadly bane,/ Thy tens o’ thousands thou hast slain!/ Vain is his hope, whose stay an’ trust is / In moral mercy, truth, and justice!
9. As for The Native people the worst ones bought our lies. Crazy Horse, after his Vision Quest, stated that the time was coming when there would be terrible fires all over the world and men would be brutal to women everywhere but in the end God is coming to judge the world. We had him murdered in 1877. Crazy Horse was not a Christian in the conventional sense. We are seeing his vision play out. There now are terrible fires all over the world. We have achieved a level of brutality towards women that would make the worst of the tyrants of yesteryear shudder. His Vision and the record we are given in the gospels point to this as a moment of climax.

10. I have numbered myself among the poor in money for decades. I am not poor in spirit. We are told to trust The Lord. Been doing that. Also am witnessing to the fruits of that trust daily.

11. The police in this city have a hard job. They do it well. Greet them with respect they return that respect.

As for peace in the world, well, it ain’t going to happen. Back in the 1970s a young Moslem told me the West would be offered the Koran and when it is refused the West would receive the Sword. We are now getting the sword. These beheadings are but the beginning.

In the meantime I am guided by this: The Sheep and the Goats

31 “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, he will sit on his glorious throne. 32 All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate the people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 33 He will put the sheep on his right and the goats on his left.

34 “Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world. 35 For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, 36 I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’

37 “Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? 38 When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? 39 When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’

40 “The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’

41 “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. 42 For I was hungry and you gave me nothing to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, 43 I was a stranger and you did not invite me in, I needed clothes and you did not clothe me, I was sick and in prison and you did not look after me.’

44 “They also will answer, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or needing clothes or sick or in prison, and did not help you?’

45 “He will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me.’

46 “Then they will go away to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life.”

My Christ is the least of these. I have brought strangers into my home and helped them get their feet on the ground. I bring strangers into my home and help them get their feet on the ground. I certainly do not see myself as one free from sin but then neither do I turn my back on people.

The function of the artist is to disturb. His duty is to arouse the sleeper, to shake the complacent killers of the world. He reminds the world of its dark ancestry, shows the world its present and points the way to its new birth. He is at once the product and preceptor of his time… In a world terrified of change, he preaches revolution – the principle of life. He is an agitator, a disturber of the peace – quick, impatient, positive, restless and disquieting. He is the creative spirit of life, working in the soul of men.”—Norman Bethune.

Bethune was a communist and, most likely, an atheist. His definition of the role of the artist is exactly that of an Old Testament Prophet.

It is the definition I chose long ago to live by as an artist in my time. It is also the best reply to Number 5: Cultural Growth.

I found this Vision of Pope Leo XIII by chance. It certainly sheds a light on the suffering of the Church in our time. The thing is the maximum of 100 years asked for was up in 1988. The House Built On Rock has stood the storm. This is a cause for joy.

Vision Of Pope Leo XIII

The Six Important Lessons I Learned In School

Lesson # 1.

My father’s family was Roman Catholic. My mother’s was Church of England. He was a son of one of the town’s most respected families. She was literally from the wrong side of the tracks. He was the Black sheep of his family. She was the strong will headed woman of her’s. She would do anything to get her own way. There was a big fight between my mother and my dad’s family about whether or nor I would go to Roman Catholic school or public school. They were shouting. She said, “Why don’t we let him decide?”

That night, alone, she said, “Do you want to public school with the good kids or Catholic school with the bad kids.”

Lesson learned: I learned my mother would stop at nothing to get her way though it took me a few years of observation to realize it.

Lesson # 2.

When I came home from public school the first day my Catholic cousins were waiting for me with sticks, stones and names.

Lesson learned: I learned those who are our friends one moment can turn against us the next for no good reason. This has stood me in good stead.

Lesson # 3.

In grade two we were asked to draw stick figures of men and women. When asked to draw them in grade one I had done nudes instead of the usual figures. “You are an artist,” said my teacher. She was the wife of the principal. She gave me colored bits of chalk and encourage me. Seeing my nudes my grade two teacher said, “You have a dirty mind.” She beat me.

Lesson learned: I learned a teacher could be wrong. When they were you took the beating but did not change.

Lesson # 4.

My sister had watched me go to school and leave her behind for two years. She used to play with the principal’s niece. As we approached the school I saw the principal entering. I told my sister to say hello to her. When I picked her up at noon to bring her home she was in tears. The principal had had her called from her class to the office where she was given the strap for speaking directly to her.

Lesson learned: Sometimes, often, the only thing we can do is remember.

Lesson # 5.

The years passed. I was in grade eleven. The teacher asked me to speak impromptu (off the cuff) before the class. As I was speaking I saw a word coming out that meant a trip to the office and the use of the strap. I looked for an alternate word. There was not one. I accepted the strap. To my surprise I did not get it. The next day another student used the same word. He got the strap. I was furious. “Are you trying to make me look like teacher’s pet? I used that word yesterday. Nothing happened. He uses it today, he gets the strap. What is going on here?”

“I watched you choosing. I watched you accepting the responsibility of your choice. You were right. It was the right word. He was just walking through the door you opened.”

Lesson learned: The difference between liberty and license. Liberty accepts the responsibility for the action (the price or penalty). License always seeks to evade it. License follows liberty like night follows day.

Lesson # 6.

“You have the wrong attitude! You will starve in two weeks if you leave this school today,” roared my high school principal.

I had no money and no prospects. Nonetheless I walked out of school that moment.

Lesson learned: Had I not left I would have starved.

I had wonderful teachers in the first and second grades who taught me everything I know. After that, I’m afraid, the teachers were nice, but they were dopes...I have a lack of ideology, and not because I have an animus against any particular ideology; it’s just that they don’t make sense to me…they get in the way of thinking. I don’t see what use they are…University and uniformity, as ideals, have subtly influenced how people thought about education, politics, economics, government, everything…We are misled by universities and other intellectual institutions to believe that there are separate fields of knowledge. But it’s clear there are no separate fields of knowledge. It is a seamless web.”-Jane Jacobs whose books, from her first, THE DEATH AND LIFE OF THE GREAT AMERICAN CITIES to her last, DARK AGE AHEAD, are must reading.

“Most teachers say you should go to school to get your degree to have something to fall back on. Aside from being a huge lie, that also creates a very high level of mediocrity, because nobody who really believes that is going to take the leap of faith required to be a serious artist. Stay out of school.”–Ellis Marsalis to his sons Branford, Delfeayo and Wynton.

“School is an institution built on the axiom that learning is the result of teaching. And institutional wisdom continues to accept this axiom, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary,”–Ivan Illich.

It is all in the translation

One day when those around me gave me an ultimatum to either do what they wanted or they would leave I said, “Good-bye.”

As they walked out I opened the copy of THE NEW TESTAMENT on my desk.

My eyes fell to these words: “If you walk with me your father, your mother, everyone you know will turn against you. If you continue with me you will possess your self.”

In that instant I realized that until I possess my self I possess nothing.

Everyone I knew, family, friends, already had turned against me. Adding Jesus would change nothing in that regard. It would give me a better reason to endure.

One day a friend who saw himself as Born Again but whose grasp of what Jesus taught was not even rudimentary (as with so many of those who proclaim themselves Born Again while they beat us over the head with THE BIBLE) caused me to say, “You can not worship this book.” Having said that I then tore my copy in half.

I had made the mistake of thinking all translation were the same. They are not.

All other translations in that passage have, “If you continue with me you will be saved,” or “find salvation.” In any case what is there is close but misses the mark.

The literal meaning of the word “sin” is “to miss the mark.”

I found that copy of THE NEW TESTAMENT at my uncle’s home in Ottawa. My uncle, Douglas Hartt, had studied to be a priest. He had chosen to enter the Civil Service. He had risen to Director General of Public Works Canada in the government of Pierre Trudeau. That is as high as one can rise in the civil service in this country.

Before I read it I had spent two years (1968 and 1969) studying THE WILHELM/BAYNES edition of THE I CHING.

In the winter of 1970 a friend invited me out to Hollywood. I went by bus taking only THE NEW TESTAMENT with me to read. I wanted to read it neither for belief nor faith but simply to see what it had to say.

To my great surprise much of what I read I already had met in THE I CHING.

“Don’t you want to take that with you,” said the friend with whom I had left it.

I replied, “If I need it it will be where I am.”

I took only THE NEW TESTAMENT because I was intent on reading it. By the time I got to Hollywood I had read it cover to cover five times. In different translation I have now read it cover to cover over five hundred times.

None of the other translations focus on self possession which is what Jesus taught.

In fact, I had almost come to believe that translation might be a figment of my imagination. Then I spoke with a priest who said, “You had THAT translation did you.”

I should have asked him which one it is.

A fellow I met by chance in Hollywood invited me to his home.

He said, “Would you care for a coffee?”

“Sure,” I replied.

“Have a seat in the living room.”

I sat down in a large easy chair.

He came in, sat the coffee down on the arm of the chair. I reached to pick up the mug then saw directly in front of it the same copy of THE I CHING I had left behind in Toronto.

“Are you into that?” I asked.

“No. We had a fellow staying here who was into that. When he left he left it behind. We asked if he did not want to take it. He told us, ‘No, if I need it it will be where I am. There is someone coming who will want it.'”

Hearing my own words echoed I knew the someone was myself.

I borrowed it. I spent the next two weeks around the corner from where I was staying on Melrose at The Hollywood Cemetery at the grave of Douglas Fairbanks reading THE I CHING in conjunction with THE NEW TESTAMENT.

I do not regret tearing up my copy. Had I not I would not have discovered how far below the mark (how steeped in sin) all other translations including THE KING JAMES are.

Human beings want systems to believe in. Systems, all systems, enslave us.

People join organizations so that they will not be alone.

THE I CHING teaches that the superior man walks alone and undaunted. When he has to he renounces the world.

Inferior men think the superior man, themselves, above all others. They seek positions of power.

THE I CHING teaches that the superior man sees himself as a servant. This echoes Jesus who said, “The son of man has come to serve not to be served.”

A few weeks back I received another in a long line of anonymous phone calls from a person calling me the enemy of Jesus. He left a message as I was unable to answer the phone. The number it came from, like the person who left it, is dead.

In the meantime I am still seeking that powerful translation of THE NEW TESTAMENT. I do not need it. I read it through cover to cover so many times that every word of it is  written on my heart.

I want it so that once I have it I can direct others to it.

In John’s first letter he writes, “You have no need that any man should teach you.”

THE I CHING teaches that we can not separate learning from doing adding that when we do both become sterile. This is what Jesus meant when he taught that faith without works and works without faith are dead.

The fruit of learning by doing, of faith with works is KNOWLEDGE.

I had three strong women enter my life: Jane Jacobs whose books from THE DEATH AND LIFE OF GREAT AMERICAN CITIES to her last DARK AGE AHEAD are essential reading; Judith Merril who was the mother of modern speculative/science fiction; and Doris Mehegan who was the librarian of THE SPACED OUT LIBRARY (now THE MERRIL COLLECTION).

All three taught that what we call babies are really adult minds in small bodies. They said, “Talk to infants as you would to an adult.”

“You have the wrong attitude. If you leave this school you will starve in two weeks,” my high school principal roared at me when I was seventeen in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

That night found me on the streets of Toronto with just enough money in my pocket to buy a beer. I was under age. Drinking age was then twenty-one. I did not let that stop me. Good thing, too, because I was about to meet a very important person.

Today I look back with the realization that had I not left I would have starved.

I encourage other young people to take the chance I took. Very few of them do. Most make themselves into slaves. But now and then one of them flies free.

Why do men make themselves slaves? For the same reason Essau sold his birthright to his brother Jacob. For a bowl of soup.

Here is Hexagram 27 of THE I CHING:

27. I / Corners of the Mouth (Providing Nourishment)

		above  KêN  KEEPING STILL, MOUNTAIN
		below  CHêN  THE AROUSING, THUNDER


This hexagram is a picture of an open mouth; above and below are firm lines 
of the lips, and between them the opening. Starting with the mouth, through 
which we take food for nourishment, the thought leads to nourishment 
itself. Nourishment of oneself, specifically of the body, is represented in the 
three lower lines, while the three upper lines represent nourishment and 
care of others, in a higher, spiritual sense.

	THE JUDGMENT

	THE CORNERS OF THE MOUTH.
	Perseverance brings good fortune.
	Pay heed to the providing of nourishment
	And to what a man seeks
	To fill his own mouth with.

In bestowing care and nourishment, it is important that the right people 
should be taken care of and that we should attend to our own nourishment 
in the right way. If we wish to know what anyone is like, we have only to 
observe on whom he bestows his care and what sides of his own nature he 
cultivates and nourishes. Nature nourishes all creatures. The great man 
fosters and takes care of superior men, in order to take care of all men 
through them. Mencius says about this:

If we wish to know whether anyone is superior or not, we need only observe 
what part of his being he regards as especially important. The body has 
superior and inferior, important and unimportant parts. We must not injure 
important parts for the sake of the unimportant, nor must we injure the 
superior parts for the sake of the inferior. He who cultivates the inferior parts 
of his nature is an inferior man. He who cultivates the superior parts of his 
nature is a superior man.

	THE IMAGE
	
	At the foot of the mountain, thunder:
	The image of PROVIDING NOURISHMENT.
	Thus the superior man is careful of his words
	And temperate in eating and drinking.

"God comes forth in the sign of the Arousing": when in the spring the life 
forces stir again, all things comes into being anew. "He brings to perfection in 
the sign of Keeping Still": thus in the early spring, when the seeds fall to 
earth, all things are made ready. This is an image of providing nourishment 
through movement and tranquillity.  The superior man takes it as a pattern 
for the nourishment and cultivation of his character. Words are a movement 
going form within outward. Eating and drinking are movements from 
without inward. Both kinds of movement can be modified by tranquillity. 
For tranquillity keeps the words that come out of the mouth from exceeding 
proper measure, and keeps the food that goes into the mouth from exceeding 
its proper measure. Thus character is cultivated.

	THE LINES

	Nine at the beginning means:
	You let your magic tortoise go,
	And look at me with the corners of your mouth drooping.
	Misfortune.

The magic tortoise is a creature possessed of such supernatural powers that it 
lives on air and needs no earthly nourishment. The image means that a man 
fitted by nature and position to live freely and independently renounces this 
self-reliance and instead looks with envy and discontent at others who are 
outwardly in better circumstances. But such base envy only arouses derision 
and contempt in those others. This has bad results.

	Six in the second place means:
	Turning to the summit for nourishment,
	Deviating from the path
	To seek nourishment from the hill.
	Continuing to do this brings misfortune.

Normally a person either provides his own means of nourishment or is 
supported in a proper way by those whose duty of privilege it is to provide for 
him. If, owing to weakness of spirit, a man cannot support himself, a feeling 
of uneasiness comes over him; this is because in shirking the proper way of 
obtaining a living, he accepts support as a favor from those in higher place. 
This is unworthy, for he is deviating from his true nature. Kept up 
indefinitely, this course leads to misfortune.

	Six in the third place means:
	Turning away from nourishment.
	Perseverance brings misfortune.
	Do not act thus for ten years.
	Nothing serves to further.
	
He who seeks nourishment that does not nourish reels from desire to 
gratification and in gratification craves desire. Mad pursuit of pleasure for the 
satisfaction of the senses never brings one to the goal. One should never (ten 
years is a complete cycle of time) follow this path, for nothing good can come 
of it.

	Six in the fourth place means:
	Turning to the summit
	For provision of nourishment
	Brings good fortune.
	Spying about with sharp eyes
	Like a tiger with insatiable craving.
	No blame.

In contrast to the six in the second place, which refers to a man bent 
exclusively on his own advantage, this line refers to one occupying a high 
position and striving to let his light sine forth. To do this he needs helpers, 
because he cannot attain his lofty aim alone. With the greed of a hungry tiger 
he is on the lookout for the right people. Since he is not working for himself 
but for the good of all, there is no wrong in such zeal.

	° Six in the fifth place means:
	Turning away from the path.
	To remain persevering brings good fortune.
	One should not cross the great water.

A man may be conscious of a deficiency in himself. He should be 
undertaking the nourishment of the people, but he has not the strength to do 
it. Thus he must turn from his accustomed path and beg counsel and help 
from a man who is spiritually his superior but undistinguished outwardly. If 
he maintains this attitude of mind perseveringly, success and good fortune 
are his. But he must remain aware of his dependence. He must not put his 
own person forward nor attempt great labors, such as crossing the great water.

	° Nine at the top means:
	The source of nourishment.
	Awareness of danger brings good fortune.
	It furthers one to cross the great water.

This describes a sage of the highest order, from whom emanate all influences 
that provide nourishment for others. Such a position brings with it heavy 
responsibility. If he remains conscious of this fact, he has good fortune and 
may confidently undertake even great and difficult labors, such as crossing 
the great water. These undertakings bring general happiness for him and for 
all others.
"Nine at the beginning means:
	You let your magic tortoise go,
	And look at me with the corners of your mouth drooping.
	Misfortune."
I have been trusting in my magic tortoise since 1968. 

Trust in yours.

 

 

THE PHANTOM 13THE PHANTOM 1 THE PHANTOM 2 THE PHANTOM 3 THE PHANTOM 4 THE PHANTOM 5 THE PHANTOM 6 THE PHANTOM 7 THE PHANTOM 8 THE PHANTOM 9 THE PHANTOM 10 THE PHANTOM 11 THE PHANTOM 12

The Path Of The Hero: MAE WEST

Mae West would not come to most minds as an heroic person. She was and of the highest order.

Mae West would not come to most minds as an heroic person. She was and of the highest order.

1932_Done-Hm-Wr_72dpi 1932_Mae_swan-bed Mae-West_she-done-him-wrong_1933_inspiration-lingerie_madebynoemi she_done_him_wrong_xlg tumblr_lbwpdsl8I11qbrdf3o1_500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7pm: Saturday, August 23, 30; Mae West in SHE DONE HIM WRONG (1933). This picture was condemned by the Catholic Legion of Decenct. The only indecent thing is that for years it could not be seen.

THE CINEFORUM, 463 Bathurst below College Across From The Beer Store. You may bring your own food and drink. Donation $20. $10 under 24.

Introductiion By Reg Hartt.

 

When George Raft starred in NIGHT AFTER NIGHT for Paramount Pictures in 1932 a part in the picture called for a Texas Guinan type character.

George said he wanted Mae West. George got $191.64 a week from Paramount for starring in NIGHT AFTER NIGHT.

Mae got $5,000.00 a week to do a walk on.

Well, when she walked on she walked off with the picture.

Hers is a fascinating story. You can hear part of it tonight.

 

 

My mother does not approve of you…

THE Foll with a surface value of  zero is actually the highest valued cvard in THE TAROT. The hidden meaning is simple. That which the world values least has the greatest value.

THE FOOL with a surface value of zero is actually the highest valued cvard in THE TAROT. The hidden meaning is simple. That which the world values least has the greatest value. All those other cards are people seeking what THE FOOL has found.

Jane Jacobs 4

Jane Jacobs 8 Amazing-Impact David Beard

I got the Christmas Card from Chuck Jones the last Christmas of his life. Not bad for someone who was told ny his high school principal, "You have the wrong attitude. If you leave this school today you will starve in two weeks." Had I not left I would have starved.

I got this Christmas Card from Chuck Jones the last Christmas of his life. Not bad for someone who was told ny his high school principal, “You have the wrong attitude. If you leave this school today you will starve in two weeks.” Had I not left I would have starved.

Reg Hartt   3 Reg Hartt   4 Reg Hartt   13

78-tarot-cards fellowship-of-the-fool-09783

Here we see the effect of civilization. As time passes our cocks and balls need to be covered up so that people with delicate sensibilities will not be offended by the sight of that to which they owe their existence. The shame is that so many men are eager to cover up that which they should be flaunting with pride.

Here we see the effect of civilization. As time passes our cocks and balls need to be covered up so that people with delicate sensibilities will not be offended by the sight of that to which they owe their existence. The shame is that so many men are eager to cover up that which they should be flaunting with pride.

Jerzy Zaborski marseilles-tarot

Keinosuke arrived here from Japan. He came, went back to Japan and returned. His presence here was electric. He got naked at the drop of a bicycle tire. Turned out he is from Osaka. They are all holy fools there.

Keinosuke arrived here from Japan. He came, went back to Japan and returned. His presence here was electric. He got naked at the drop of a bicycle tire. Turned out he is from Osaka. They are all holy fools there.

As we get farther and farther from the archetype nform replaces content, disbelief replaces faith, ritual replaces action.

As we get farther and farther from the archetype nform replaces content, disbelief replaces faith, ritual replaces action.

Jane Jacobs first and foremost was a wife and a mother. Her formal traing endfed at grade twelve. "I had wonderful teachers in the first and second grades who taught me  everything I know. After that, I'm afraid, the teachers were nice, but  they were dopes...I have a lack of ideology, and not because I have an  animus against any particular ideology; it's just that they don't make  sense to me...they get in the way of thinking. I don't see what use they  are...University and uniformity, as ideals, have subtly influenced how  people thought about education, politics, economics, government,  everything...We are misled by universities and other intellectual  institutions to believe that there are separate fields of knowledge.  But it's clear there are no separate fields of knowledge. It is a  seamless web."-Jane Jacobs .

Jane Jacobs first and foremost was a wife and a mother. Her formal training ended at grade twelve. “I had wonderful teachers in the first and second grades who taught me everything I know. After that, I’m afraid, the teachers were nice, but they were dopes…I have a lack of ideology, and not because I have an animus against any particular ideology; it’s just that they don’t make sense to me…they get in the way of thinking. I don’t see what use they
are…University and uniformity, as ideals, have subtly influenced how people thought about education, politics, economics, government, everything…We are misled by universities and other intellectual institutions to believe that there are separate fields of knowledge. But it’s clear there are no separate fields of knowledge. It is a seamless web.”-Jane Jacobs .

Boys and their mothers…

“He who without the Muse’s madness in his soul comes knocking at the door of poesy and thinks that art will make him anything fit to be called a poet, finds that the poetry which he indites in his sober senses is beaten hollow by the poetry of madmen.”-Plato.

The poet Ranier Maria Rilke had a mother who wanted a daughter. She dressed her son as a girl, had his hair grown as a girl.s and, when he knocked at the door to her room she asked, “Is that my naughty Ranier or my lovely Charlotte.”

The boy would reply, “It is your lovely Charlotte, mother.”

As Robert Bly puts it, with a mother like that you either kill yourself or you become a great poet.

I met a mother like that this week.

Not all mothers are monsters nor are all fathers. It is important to remember that.

Some are. The mother of Grendel in the story of Beowulf is certainly a monster. Her son goes on murdereous rampages. These do not upset her. But when Beowulf dives down the well where he finds Grendel curled up licking his wounds under his mother’s teats the harm done to her son upsets her.

She says to Beowulf, “Who are you?”

The hero replies, “I am your death.”

The weak among you ignorant of the violence done by Grendel will say that is too strong. You will allow Grendel and his mother to continue to suck the marrow from the bones of the men, women and children they murder. Standing up to a monster is not an easy thing to do.

Beowulf does indeed slay the pair for which the people make him King.

He is a smart man, this hero. He knows that the strength he has today will ebb away tomorrow, that the day will come when the foolish young not knowing of yesterday will say of the old man before them, as our young do the veterans of our battles, “That old fart is a hero?!”

So he has the young men trained to become warriors.

The problem is that training accomplishes nothing.

A course in NICHIREN BUDDHISM advertised on the streets of Toonto offers to give those who take it the meaning of life.nichiren

Life has no meaning. Our life, my life, has no meaning except the meaning I, we, give it when we stand up to monsters and defeat them utterly.

Time passes. Beowulf is older, much older, and fatter, much fatter.

Everything is going along swimmingly until one day a dragon appears.

All those men trained as warriors take one look at this monster. Then their bladders burst, their bowels break, and the marrow seeps from their bones.

As one they cry, “I’m outa here!”

They can’t get out fast enough.

So fat, old Beowulf corseted up once again dons his armor. The old man steps out before the dragon which, seeing him, roars, “And who the fuck are you?”

The old man says once again as he has said before, “I am your death.”

The dragon belches fire and smoke, laughs deep rumbling laughs and heads towards this fat old fool who dares to dream that he has the power to slay such a magnificent, monstrous being.

The laughter, the fire, the smoke ceases as the horror it has exerted on others now falls upon the dragon. In its death rattle it, by chance, sinks a poisoned fang in the shoulder of Beowulf.

The hero dies.

The old Norse poets were telling us heroes are born not made. They were telling it as clearly as it can be told.

This, by the way, is NOT how this story is told in any of the silly movies made from it.

Plato, of course, has said the same thing in that scrap posted at the start of this: “He who without the Muse’s madness in his soul comes knocking at the door of poesy and thinks that art will make him anything fit to be called a poet, finds that the poetry which he indites in his sober senses is beaten hollow by the poetry of madmen.”

A Grendel wormed his way in here this year. Then his mother showed up. Monsters do not take kindly to having their masks ripped off.

Plato’s world was filled with those who played at being poets. They excelled at grammar and punctuation as do those in our time who play at being poets.

But the Muse’s madness is not in their souls for it is that and that alone that inspires.

I never get tired of posting these largely because they fall upon ears willfully deaf:

“Most teachers say you should go to school to get your degree to have something to fall back on. Aside from being a huge lie, that also creates a very high level of mediocrity, because nobody who really believes that is going to take the leap of faith required to be a serious artist. Stay out of school.”–Ellis Marsalis to his sons Branford, Delfeayo and Wynton.

“It is good taste not bad taste which is the enemy.”-Salvador Dali/Pablo Picasso/Henri Langlois/Reg Hartt.

“The function of the artist is to disturb. His duty is to arouse the sleeper, to shake the complacent pillars of the world. He reminds the world of its dark ancestry, and shows the world its present and points the way to its new birth. He is at once the product and preceptor of his times.”-Norman Bethune.

“You have no need that any man should teach you.”-1 John 2:27.

“Film students should stay as far away from film schools and film teachers as possible. The only school for the cinema is the cinema.”-Bernardo Bertolucci.

“It is, in fact, nothing short of a miracle that the modern methods of  instruction have not entirely strangled the holy curiosity of inquiry;  for this delicate little plant, aside from stimulation, stands mainly in need of freedom; without this it goes to wrack and ruin without fail. It is a very great mistake to think that the enjoyment of seeing and searching can be promoted by means of coercion and a sense of duty.”–Albert Einstein.

“My schooling not only failed to teach me what it professed to be teaching, but prevented me from being educated to an extent which infuriates me when I think of all I might have learned at home by myself.”–George Bernard Shaw.

“Men are born ignorant, not stupid. They are made stupid by education.”–Bertrand Russell.

“School is an institution built on the axiom that learning is the result of teaching. And institutional wisdom continues to accept this axiom, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary.”–Ivan Illich.

“We get three educations. The first is from our parents; the second is from our schoolmasters. The third is from life. The last makes liars of the first two.”–Montesquieu.

“I had wonderful teachers in the first and second grades who taught me everything I know. After that, I’m afraid, the teachers were nice, but  they were dopes…I have a lack of ideology, and not because I have an animus against any particular ideology; it’s just that they don’t make sense to me…they get in the way of thinking. I don’t see what use they are…University and uniformity, as ideals, have subtly influenced how people thought about education, politics, economics, government, everything…We are misled by universities and other intellectual institutions to believe that there are separate fields of knowledge. But it’s clear there are no separate fields of knowledge. It is a seamless web.”-Jane Jacobs whose books, from her first, THE DEATH AND
LIFE OF THE GREAT AMERICAN CITIES to her last, DARK AGE AHEAD, are must reading.

This week with the beheading of journalist James Foley another dragon has appeared on the scene. We witness the murder of the man on the web over and over. As I listen to him speak the words he says ring false. These are not the words of a man about to be beheaded. They are manufactured words aswas the death rattle of Jack Layton. They ring false from beginning to end. Falser still are the words of his be-header. Then we find that there was an elaborate plot to extort money.

It is not God but gold that this is about. The truth does not need violence to be believed. The lie does.

Conversion by fear is not conversion but expediency.

The only problem is that today we no longer have a Beowulf around to slay the thing.

He died a long time ago.

So prepare yourself for it is going to get worse, much, much worse.

This is a time when we breed Grendels who thirst for blood while we murder heroes in their beds.

But the mother knows in her heart that the darling boy she raised has no balls.

She made sure of that. Mothers want sissies for sons.

This is why in tribal societies men steal sons away from the mothers. Once they have the boy far away from his mother they would wound him, maybe knock out a tooth. The boy would grow out of terror to become a man.

The places our mothers don’t want us to go are the places we must go.

We start out in our lives like Columbus setting sail for India only to discover we have not a clue where we are. It is at that moment that the real journey begins.

For myself, one of the greatest gifts came into my life by chance which is how it should be as THE BOOK OF CHANGES (THE I CHING) is all about chance. At 22 I read in its pages ideas I knew at once to be true. One of the things it teaches is the importance of being able to stand alone, undaunted, when the world turns it back on truth.

Those NICHIREN BUDDHISTS miss the mark when they offer an answer. But then, our entire education system misses the mark.

“Now we know what you are,” said Grendel’s mama to me this week.

Yes, you do. I am your death.

6257748 grendel mom

This good boy when asked, "Is it my naughty Ranier or my lovely Charlotte," replied, "It is your lovely Charlotte." It takes a man to free a boy from his mother. That boy once freed will become a great man.

This good boy when asked, “Is it my naughty Ranier or my lovely Charlotte,” replied, “It is your lovely Charlotte.” It takes a man to free a boy from his mother. That boy once freed will become a great man.

rilke_dite

Like many mothers she raised her son to be a girl.

Like many mothers she raised her son to be a girl.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainer_Maria_Rilke

 

 

 

 

 

When mothers castrate their sons…

The rich young manJerzy Zaborski

Postcard From Emo

Postcard From Emo

 

 

 

 

 

Like the belief of the terminally ill in medicine, the belief of the legitimately frightened in the educational process is a comforting lie.”–David Mamet, TRUE AND FALSE.

“My knowledge of silent films, German and French cinema, came an awful lot from Reg Hartt’s Cineforum. At first he showed films at Innis College, then he had a place on Mercer St. for a while. Reg showed some really incredible silent films, from Phantom of the Opera to D.W. Griffith’s films. His strength was putting incredibly good soundtracks on the films. He has a really good ear for movie music and back in the good old days when it was all analog, he would splice them together himself.”–Shirley Hughes, TORONTO SILENT FILM SOCIETY.

In a recording I have of one of his live readings a woman in the audience said to poet Robert Bly, “Do you know when you read your poetry your voice falls off towards the end.”

Bly roared back at her with his voice falling back to a barely audible whisper at the end, “Yes, I know that when I read my poetry my voice falls off towards the end and I will not be shamed by you today.”

I thought of that this week when one of the stupidest people I have ever met sat before me. To her face I told her that she was one of the stupidest people I have ever met.”

“Now we know what you are!” she said with glee.

I said to myself, “Now I know what you are.”

This woman had come into my home, accepted my hospitality, ate my food, drank my wine and dismissed completely my value as a person.

Her son had asked if he could live here. He had shown up unexpectedly with some friends in the spring. I had an early film by Stanley Kubrick on the program. “Can we see something else?” he asked.

Thinking he was going to ask for a later Kubrick I said, “Yes.”

He surprised me by asking for the first GODZILLA (1954). At once I liked him.

The presentation here is second to none in Toronto. He was used to seeing classic films on his monitor screen, on television or badly projected in the classroom.

At once he fell in love with the place.

He was studying Italian film at a nearby university. He asked if I would show him Sergio Leone’s ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST in The Cineforum. When I did it was he and I. I did not ask him to pay for the experience. He offered nothing in return.

The book he had been told to use said that guns in Italian westerns are penises.

I read the stupid book. Then I said, “You know, sometimes a gun is a gun.”

I bought a copy of David Mamet’s BAMBI VS. GODZILLA to have for his own. Mamet urges the young to stay out of school. In his book TRUE AND FALSE he writes, “Invent nothing. Deny nothing. Stand up. Speak up. Stay out of school.” (More on Mamet here:http://reghartt.ca/cineforum/?p=12475 ).

From the moment he asked if he could live here his mother was dead set against it.

He is not the first person who has asked if they could live here. He certainly won’t be the last. (http://reghartt.ca/cineforum/?p=10162).

He lived here for the month of May.

They were, I thought, supposed to arrive Monday night. I said I would prepare some food for them. He said that his mother did not drink beer, she drank wine. Where I come from when someone invites me to dinner I bring beer and/or wine. That took me back a bit but I had the wine.

They never arrived.

I figured the mother had decided not to come.

They showed up the next night around 8pm.

I invited them in. He said, “We haven’t eaten.”

I pulled the lasagna I made the day before out of the fridge, heated it up, gave him a beer and her some wine.

Things seemed to be going smoothly. She asked about films, then asked if I had seen the films of Pedro Almodovar.

“I have them all,” I told her.

I had thought he would want the room he had had but he was determined on using my archive room. I need access to that space at all hours but because he wanted to be a film maker I thought it would be good for him to be surrounded by the greatest films ever made as well as those historically most important.

One of the inspirations for THE CINEFORUM is the original Paris Cinematheque (not the current one) of Henri Langlois who said, “An art form requires genius. People of genius are always troublemakers, meaning they start from scratch, demolish accepted norms and rebuild a new world. The problem with cinema today is the dearth of troublemakers. There’s not a rabble-rouser in sight. There was still one, but he went beyond troublemaker to court jester. He clobbered the status quo. That’s Godard. We’re fresh out of “bad students.” You’ll find students masquerading as bad ones, but you won’t find the real article, because a genuine bad student upends everything.”

I thought he had the makings of being a bad student. I certainly hoped he had.

Said the great Italian film maker Bernardo Bertolucci, “Film students should stay as faraway as possible ftrom film schools and film teachers. The bonly film school for the cinema IS the cinema. The best cinema is the Paris Cinematheque. The best teacher is Henri Langlois.”

Then his mother asked if she could see the room he was to take. They were gone a considerable time.

By the time they came down the program in the screening room had ended. I invited them to sit in there.

She then told me she did not want her son living here.

As she spoke I thought of several people who had come here before.

One woman looking at a piece of art on the wall asked who had created it. “I did,” I told her.

“You did not,” she said.

“I did,” I affirmed.

“You DID NOT,” she said vehemently.

“I did,” I said again.

“YOU DID NOT!” she said.

“What makes you say that?”

“It is too good,” she said.

Another woman had come by for my JANE JACOBS program.

“This is where it is? I can’t go in there. This is terrible. I am teaching a course on Jane Jacobs. I have to see this film. I can’t go in there,” she said.

I quietly told her that Jane Jacobs had been a friend of mine from her arrival in Toronto until her death in 2006, that she had written me fan letters, that one of her sons seeing me on the street had stopped to say, “My mother adored you,” to which I had replied, “And I your mother.” I added that one writer hadwritten, “Reg Hartt’s Cineforum is everything Jane Jacobs wrote about in THE DEATH AND LIFE OF GREAT AMERICAN CITIES.” I added that Mrs. Jacobs said, “Old ideas are sometimes found in new buildings. New ideas are found in old buildings.”

The woman did not come to0 see the film. I pity her students.

As the mother spoke I told her, “Your son wants to be a film maker. He will learn more about film here than at any university.”

To my surprise not only she but also her son said, “No, that is not true.”

Well, it happens to BE true. One heckuva lot of people from around the world have spoken and written about the value of what they found here.

“Reg Hartt has devoted his whole life to bringing the film classics to the public. He treats animation-cartoons, if you will-as art. He is underfinanced, overworked and snubbed. I think we should pay tribute to him.” DAVID BEARD, owner CINEBOOKS.

“Reg Hartt teaches like Neal Cassady drove a bus.”—Joe Fiorito, Toronto Star.

“Reg Hartt has a feel for film unique in this country…genius level.”—Elwy Yost.

http://reghartt.ca/cineforum/?cat=29

Now that shocked me. I expected it from the mother but not from the son. I wondered why he had wanted to live here. I got my answer soon enough when he said, “I want to live as  an artist. To do that I have to experience poverty.”

At once I told his mother she was the stupidest person I have ever met.

“We have to leave,” he said.

“Now we know what you are,” said the mother.

I thought to myself, “Now I know what you and your son are.”

As they left I thought of another fellow who had wanted to live here while he studied at university. He came from a family with money. His mother as well did not approve of me. She had told him, “If you stay there I won’t pay your rent.”

That mother like this one castrated her son.

The only real poverty on this planet is the poverty of those who have money.

It keeps them from relying on themselves…

Ralph Waldo Emerson: ON Self-Reliance

I read the other day some verses written by an eminent painter which were original and not conventional. The soul always hears an admonition in such lines, let the subject be what it may. The sentiment they instil is of more value than any thought they may contain. To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men, — that is genius. Speak your latent conviction, and it shall be the universal sense; for the inmost in due time becomes the outmost,—— and our first thought is rendered back to us by the trumpets of the Last Judgment. Familiar as the voice of the mind is to each, the highest merit we ascribe to Moses, Plato, and Milton is, that they set at naught books and traditions, and spoke not what men but what they thought. A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected thoughts: they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty. Great works of art have no more affecting lesson for us than this. They teach us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good-humored inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else, to-morrow a stranger will say with masterly good sense precisely what we have thought and felt all the time, and we shall be forced to take with shame our own opinion from another.

There is a time in every man’s education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance; that imitation is suicide; that he must take himself for better, for worse, as his portion; that though the wide universe is full of good, no kernel of nourishing corn can come to him but through his toil bestowed on that plot of ground which is given to him to till. The power which resides in him is new in nature, and none but he knows what that is which he can do, nor does he know until he has tried. Not for nothing one face, one character, one fact, makes much impression on him, and another none. This sculpture in the memory is not without preestablished harmony. The eye was placed where one ray should fall, that it might testify of that particular ray. We but half express ourselves, and are ashamed of that divine idea which each of us represents. It may be safely trusted as proportionate and of good issues, so it be faithfully imparted, but God will not have his work made manifest by cowards. A man is relieved and gay when he has put his heart into his work and done his best; but what he has said or done otherwise, shall give him no peace. It is a deliverance which does not deliver. In the attempt his genius deserts him; no muse befriends; no invention, no hope.

Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string. Accept the place the divine providence has found for you, the society of your contemporaries, the connection of events. Great men have always done so, and confided themselves childlike to the genius of their age, betraying their perception that the absolutely trustworthy was seated at their heart, working through their hands, predominating in all their being. And we are now men, and must accept in the highest mind the same transcendent destiny; and not minors and invalids in a protected corner, not cowards fleeing before a revolution, but guides, redeemers, and benefactors, obeying the Almighty effort, and advancing on Chaos and the Dark.

What pretty oracles nature yields us on this text, in the face and behaviour of children, babes, and even brutes! That divided and rebel mind, that distrust of a sentiment because our arithmetic has computed the strength and means opposed to our purpose, these have not. Their mind being whole, their eye is as yet unconquered, and when we look in their faces, we are disconcerted. Infancy conforms to nobody: all conform to it, so that one babe commonly makes four or five out of the adults who prattle and play to it. So God has armed youth and puberty and manhood no less with its own piquancy and charm, and made it enviable and gracious and its claims not to be put by, if it will stand by itself. Do not think the youth has no force, because he cannot speak to you and me. Hark! in the next room his voice is sufficiently clear and emphatic. It seems he knows how to speak to his contemporaries. Bashful or bold, then, he will know how to make us seniors very unnecessary.

The nonchalance of boys who are sure of a dinner, and would disdain as much as a lord to do or say aught to conciliate one, is the healthy attitude of human nature. A boy is in the parlour what the pit is in the playhouse; independent, irresponsible, looking out from his corner on such people and facts as pass by, he tries and sentences them on their merits, in the swift, summary way of boys, as good, bad, interesting, silly, eloquent, troublesome. He cumbers himself never about consequences, about interests: he gives an independent, genuine verdict. You must court him: he does not court you. But the man is, as it were, clapped into jail by his consciousness. As soon as he has once acted or spoken with eclat, he is a committed person, watched by the sympathy or the hatred of hundreds, whose affections must now enter into his account. There is no Lethe for this. Ah, that he could pass again into his neutrality! Who can thus avoid all pledges, and having observed, observe again from the same unaffected, unbiased, unbribable, unaffrighted innocence, must always be formidable. He would utter opinions on all passing affairs, which being seen to be not private, but necessary, would sink like darts into the ear of men, and put them in fear.

http://www.emersoncentral.com/selfreliance.htm

The next day he returned the digital 2D/3D camera I had loaned him. He had left some luggage here. That night he had, he thought, taken all of it. He had not. He told me that someone had stolen his boots out of his suitcase.

I told him that I could care less.

I had lost a lot more than a pair of boots.

I take chances on the people I meet. I don’t play it safe. I take a chance on them all. Only rarely do I meet one not worthy of that gift.

To aspiring film makers I say this, if you are going to study film at university continue studying it there. I learned long ago that people who aspire always settle for second best.

The best need no teacher.

The boy had come here for my Stanley Kubrick program. Kubrick never took a day of public school he could get out of. He paid fellow students to take notes. He certainly did not waste time in film school or at a university. Those places are for the second rate. Kubrick was first rate. He remains the single greatest film maker of our time.

THE CINEFORUM is for the budding Kubricks. There are not very many of them.

As for the silly boy’s even sillier mother I borrow these words from Robert Bly: “I WILL NOT BE SHAMED BY YOU TODAY.”

Neal Cassady would have driven the bus over the silly vagina which, having not seen action for decades, had dried up and gone bad.

I had thought the boy capable of standing up to his mother. I was wrong. The mother won. The boy died.

For the importance of embracing the wild man and standing upto the mother gor to Robert Bly and IRON JOHN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YAL20UVvjY

Beware the rich who think that being rich means possessing money for they are the truly poor. They take without giving. My programs have always been by donation. These are the ones who give the least they can thinking always that it is more than enough. They say, “Well, they suggested $20 but I gave them $5.”

“You are just like mu uncle,” a fellow said.

“Yes?”

“My uncle ran his own business. He always gave people more than they paid for.”

That is how we tell the truly rich.

September @ THE CINEFORUM

September @ THE CINEFORUM, 463 Bathurst, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Monday, September 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

8pm: THE AMORPHOUS MIND POLICE FACTOR (2014) Chris Minz

Tuesday, September 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

8pm: OZ DARKSIDE [THE WIZARD OF OZ (1939) to Pink Floyd’s THE DARKSIDE OF THE MOON]

Wednesday, September 3, 10, 17, 24.

7pm: DON’T LOOK BACK (1967) D.A. Pennebaker

9pm: Reg Hartt Spoken Word: THE BLACKLISTED MASTERPIECES OF AL ARONOWITZ

Thursday, September 4, 11, 18, 25.

8pm: GERTRUD (1964) Carl Th. Dreyer.

Thursday, September 11.

8pm: BARRY LYNDON (1975) Stanley Kubrick.

Thursday, September 18.

8pm: CITY GIRL (1930) F. W. Murnau.

Saturday, September 6, 13, 20, 27.

7pm: THE FORBIDDEN FILMS OF BUGS BUNNY & FRIENDS

9pm: SALO: 120 DAYS OF SODOM (1975) Pier Paolo Pasolini.

Sunday, September 7, 14, 21, 28.

2pm: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW (1964) Pier Paolo Pasolini.

4pm: Herman Hesse: SIDDHARTHA (1972) Conrad Rooks.

6pm: Fritz Lang’s METROPOLIS (1927) Rescored By Reg Hartt.

9pm: KID DRACULA [NOSFERATU (1922) set to music from RADIOHEAD’S KID A & OK COMPUTER]