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Dynasty 3-D – aka Qian dao wan li zhu (Blu-ray)

Directed by Mei-Chun Chang

Release Year: 1977
Running Time: 92
UPC: 7 38329 25285 4
Color Type: Color
Country: Hong Kong
Language: English
Genres: Action
Optional English Subtitles: Yes
$29.95 $17.97 (40% off)
Cast

Tao-Liang Tan
Ying Bai
Kang Chin
David Wei Tang
Wen-Tai Li
Chiang Han
Chang Ma

Crew

Directed by Mei-Chun Chang

Fully Restored in 3-D by 3-D Film Archive! When an emperor’s son is accused of treason against the throne, he ends up in a fight for his life against all comers. Directed by Mei-Chun Chang (Revenge of the Shogun Women), this pop-out martial-arts spectacular stars Bobby Ming, Tao-Liang Tan, Kang Chin, David Wei Tang and Ying Bai, who was given an award for Best Supporting Actor at the 1977 Golden Horse Film Festival. This special edition is the first 3-D Film Archive release in Compatible 3-D, so you can view it on any system. The package has both BD3D polarized AND anaglyphic (red/cyan) 3-D versions, and contains one pair of anaglyphic 3-D glasses with information on how to acquire additional glasses.


Blu-ray Extras Include:
The House of Terror – Restored 1953 3-D Comic Book

Two Stereo Slide Presentations from 10-Time Emmy Award Winning Writer Eric Drysdale: “Sold on Stereo, Commercial 3D in the 1950s” and “Inside a Mid-century Department Store”

“Go Away I Like You Too Much” 3-D Music Video from The Simple Carnival by Jeff Boller

Super-Touch Lens System Featurette by 3-D Expert Mike Ballew, Produced by Joe Tiberio

Restored 4 channel Quadrophonic Sound

1 Pair of Anaglyphic 3-D Glasses with Information on How to Acquire Additional Glasses

Dual-Layered BD50 Disc

Optional English Subtitles

Aspect Ratio: 2.39:1

DYNASTY (1977) is one of the first films I acquired when I invested in a digital 3D system years ago. My first copy was a Field Sequential 3D DVD. This new release on 3D Blu-ray from THE 3D FILM ARCHIVE is a vast improvement on that release in every way that matters.

It’s gung ho approach to 3D is everything contemporary 3D movies aren’t.

In other words. DYNASTY is a film that delivers the goods.

I have been a supporter of THE 3D FILM ARCHIVE from the start. When asked to pony up the cash with a restoration I and the multitude of other supporters of the 3D Film Archive do. DYNASTY (1977) is one of the films we have helped bring back from the dead.

For people who love 1977s Kung Fu films DYNASTY delivers everything that could be asked for and more.

Plot wise the films throws in a twist I have never seen in a movie from that period or now. What’s the twist? I’m not going to ruin it by telling you.

I watched DYNASTY on the BIG screen at The CineForum (the main floor of my home) with an Optoma HD25-LV-WHF projector ( https://www.amazon.ca/Optoma-HD25-LV-WHD-1080p-Theater-Projector/dp/B014UIZGN8   ) plus a superb sound system which comes into play with the film’s restored Sensurround 8-track stereophonic sound track.

For those who don’t have the system I have here to see DYNASTY in digital 3D the 3D Film Archive has generated an anaglyph (red and blue glasses) version of the film that means everyone who wants to can see this film as it was made to be experienced.

One of my favorite comments comes from the disc where Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov discusses creating the music for Sergei Bondarchuk’s WAR AND PEACE. Instead of saying, “We were creating a film from a great piece of Russian literature (which is true) Ovchinnikov states, “We were making an entertainment.”

I love that. Contemporary 2D and 3D film makers would do well to make a huge sign stating  “WE ARE MAKING AN ENTERTAINMENT” so that everyone involved can see it.

DYNASTY 3D (1977) is great entertainment.

While 3D TVs are no longer being produced 3D projectors are. This 2D/3D release will allow viewers the chance to see the film. Unlike the moment when 3D TVs were introduced when there was very little available to see now, again thanks to The 3D Film Archive and others, there is a lot to be enjoyed in this exciting format.

But don’t take my word alone for it. I’ve added links to what others have to say. What do they say? DYNASTY 3D is great fun.–Reg Hartt.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezvV_bM4RJs

What plot there is, however, matters not in the slightest. Where the film delivers is in its non-stop action set pieces, comprising probably 80 minutes of the film’s 92-minute running time. There’s not even time for any romance; other than a few background extras, the movie is bereft of women.

I was expecting something like a martial arts version of Comin’ at Ya! (1981), the 3-D spaghetti Western that kick-started the 1980s 3-D revival. That film’s impressive 3-D effects eventually become tiresome, with no stone untossed at the camera. Instead, Dynasty retains all the balletic stunt work, editing and camera framing of an above-average martial arts film, while simultaneously maximizing the 3-D. Yes, spears, arrows, and even the hanging beam used to ring a bonsho bell are thrust into the camera lens but generally the staging is more in the style of ‘50s 3-D Westerns and the like, rather than the later, ‘80s revival titles.

Further, the martial arts genre’s conventions, combined with all the attractive, traditional Chinese architecture gardens and the like, make this a special treat in 3-D. The climax, the inevitable three-way bout among the leads illogically begins at Chao’s palace before instantly shifting high in the mountains, surely many hours’ travel, yet the location is strikingly beautiful and looks terrific in three dimensions.

Seeing all this outlandish action and cartoon-level gore is quite fun. So what if there’s barely a story? In one combat set-piece, a villain’s hands are chopped off, but the “It’s-only-a-flesh- wound” baddie soldiers on anyway, the fight continuing for several more minutes. In another, the bad guys fling Metaluna Mutant-like claws on long chains, decapitating many of the fighting monks, with everything flying toward and away the camera lens. The Quadrophonic sounds also adds immeasurably to the overall impact. The villains are often on horseback, their thundering hoofs first heard faintly in the front speakers before overwhelming the surrounds (while the dust they kick up lingers suspended in front of the movie screen). In theaters it must have been deafening. The sound effects one associates with the genre take on an almost avant-garde industrial quality in stereo surround. It reminded me of some of Spike Jones’s later experimental recordings.

Dynasty (QIAN DAO WAN LI ZHU) hits Blu-ray this week thanks to Kino Lorber and the 3D Film Archive who’ve been working tirelessly to restore and release these forgotten 3D films allowing viewers to see them as they were intended. This however is their first release to be compatible with non 3D TVs, so the disc comes with a Red/Blue anaglyph version as well as the polarized 3D version for this release. The film was originally released in 1977 and was the first Hong Kong/Taiwan production to be both a 3-D feature and also utilizing Quadrophonic or Sensurround a 8 track stereophonic sound system, which was originally conceived for Universal’s 1974 disasterpiece Earthquake. The big innovation here was the addition of extra bass for low frequency sounds. I originally caught Dynasty at Exhumed Films’ 2017 iteration of Ex-Fest, where a battered pinkish 3D print blew the audience away with its over the top violence, that was only amplified by its third dimension antics.  https://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/review/74750?fbclid=IwAR0tB1p9z1RkIwvdGlvLbsDWeqqyPnzpA3OhP7Oxi6NWXwY4teg1Z0VkosQ

https://cinapse.co/dynasty-dominates-on-blu-ray-3d-eafc81ea1dd4

DYNASTY Dominates on Blu-ray 3D!

Dan Tabor

Dynasty (QIAN DAO WAN LI ZHU) hits Blu-ray this week thanks to Kino Lorber and the 3D Film Archive who’ve been working tirelessly to restore and release these forgotten 3D films allowing viewers to see them as they were intended. This however is their first release to be compatible with non 3D TVs, so the disc comes with a Red/Blue anaglyph version as well as the polarized 3D version for this release. The film was originally released in 1977 and was the first Hong Kong/Taiwan production to be both a 3-D feature and also utilizing Quadrophonic or Sensurround a 8 track stereophonic sound system, which was originally conceived for Universal’s 1974 disasterpiece Earthquake. The big innovation here was the addition of extra bass for low frequency sounds. I originally caught Dynasty at Exhumed Films’ 2017 iteration of Ex-Fest, where a battered pinkish 3D print blew the audience away with its over the top violence, that was only amplified by its third dimension antics.

Directed by Mei-Chang, who also helmed Young Dragons and the pinnacle of 3D Kung-fu, and future Kino release, the completely bonkers Revenge of the Shogun Women. Dynasty is a down and dirty, low budget helping of Hong Kong Chopsocky, that after starting off with a convoluted setup quickly finds its footing as a brutal tale of vengeance. This could also be because this version feels somewhat truncated — we even see stills of scenes not present in the feature. The film is the story of Sao Chin Tan (Tao-Liang Tan) a young warrior who is trained by monks and has seven days to defeat the mighty Eunuch Chao — the man who killed his master and his parents, after Chao has been robbed of his kung fu for skills thanks to a surgical blow to the head. Expect plenty of 3D gags while Sao fights his way to the top involving plenty of beheadings, a guy getting both hands chopped off and who continues to fight, and Eunuch Chao punching a hole through a man’s chest.

While the quality of the first half of the film is a bit rough — obviously a scan of a well worn and spliced release print, about half way through the quality appears to sharpen up, due to possibly a better available source. Grain and 3D aren’t a great mix (that’s why if you’ve seen that T2 disc it’s been DNR’ed to death) and the first half at times gets a bit soft in spots probably due to the generations from the negative the first half is from the second. But you really can’t complain too much given if this film wouldn’t have been released otherwise, and it’s a great example of Silver Age regional 3D cinema from Asia. Dynasty is a fun, hyper violent kung-fu spectacle that definitely benefits from its use of the third dimension. The 3D gags make great use of the 3D space both the subtle spatial ones and not so subtle “comin at ya” moments. There’s just a different feel to films that were shot in 3D that of course feel more organic in how they inhabit the space as opposed to our current crop of post converts, which most films are these days.

Like all 3D Archive releases, every bit of that 50gig Blu-ray is packed with extras. You get Dynasty in both Red/Blue anaglyph version as well as the polarized 3D version, one pair of 3D glasses (More can be purchased online) and: The House of Terror — Restored 1953 3-D Comic Book, Two Stereo Slide Presentations from 10-Time Emmy Award Winning Writer Eric Drysdale: Sold on Stereo, Commercial 3D in the 1950s, Inside a Mid-century Department Store and 3-D Music Video from The Simple Carnival by Jeff Boller Go Away I Like You Too Much. To be honest, as a 3D geek I would love to know more about either the restoration, or the 3D process they are using to convert a polarized 3D film to an anaglyph one, since I fall into the categories of film and tech nerd who loves hearing about how these things work.

Like all 3D Archive releases Dynasty is yet another loaded entry that has one hell of a blast. The bonus here being those without 3D setups can now enjoy these releases. Which given the fact that the 3D trend has run it course and most manufacturers aren’t making new 3D capable devices, it makes sense and would give them the ability to broaden their reach. I really dug Dynasty and for those that enjoy this film I can’t suggest their future release Revenge of the Shogun Women enough, the film drops any pretense of respectability of Dynasty and just revels in its exploitative nature. Its story of a village of women who after being raped by a group of roaming marauders, became kung-fu fighting Shaolin monks and must choose between bloody revenge and their peaceful teachings when the marauders show back up a over a decade later.

But until then definitely check out Dynasty!

https://cinapse.co/dynasty-dominates-on-blu-ray-3d-eafc81ea1dd4

Non-stop violent action, incredible stunts and eye-popping 3-D effects make Kino Lorber’s release of stereoscopic 1977 Chinese/Taiwanese martial arts adventure film Dynasty on Blu-ray a must own for fans of fun….The 90-minute long film was so enjoyable that I was shocked when it ended. Time flies when you’re having fun, they say, and that adage certainly applies here.

Dynasty needs to be viewed in 3-D to be fully appreciated. All manner of objects penetrate the screen and enter your living room when watching this crazy-wild movie in 3-D. Swords, gong hammers, tree branches, severed heads, severed limbs, fists, kicking feet, bird cages, rocks, spears, arrows, sticks, a scalp, a weaponized umbrella … anything and everything is flying out of the screen.

One of the neatest scenes involves Kung Fu fighters using flying guillotines to remove victims’ heads. Flying guillotines consist of steel pincers lined with sharp blades attached to long chains. Users whip the chains toward a victim where the pincers close and lock around their necks. Users then pull on the chains and heads go flying. The fashion in which this sequence is staged in 3-D is brilliant. A pincer flies directly toward the screen (and into your living space), clamps onto a victim’s neck, and a decapitated head flies into the background, helping to stretch the sense of depth to every conceivable limit.

https://classicsonbluray.com/martial-arts-adventure-dynasty-is-eye-popping-stunner-in-3-d

Hong Kong Chopsocky cinema gets an extra dimension of action and adventure with the 70s 3-D classic Dynasty (no relation to the 80s television series). Directed by Mei-Chang and starring Bobby Ming and Tao-Liang Tan, a simple tale of revenge goes big on bloody action and spectacle with this over-the-top adventure. 3-D Film Archive has done another masterclass restoration on a piece that’s notoriously problematic fixing numerous misalignment issues for a 3-D presentation that’s probably better than the original theatrical run. Not perfect, but pretty damn great considering. Add in a glorious dynamic restored quadrophonic sound mix, both polarized and anaglyph 3-D with some great extras, this is another winning release….

Dynasty isn’t a great movie – but it’s very entertaining. It’s high-energy with some great action spectacle all captured in 3-D. While the system used to capture the film was problematic, there are amazing flourishes of visual potential. After another successful Kickstarter effort, The 3-D Film Archive has managed to do something of the impossible and restore this 70s martial arts gem to some semblance of glory.

The transfer may not be the most beautiful ever, but you can feel and appreciate the restoration effort. Presented in Blu-ray 3-D, 2-D, and Anaglyph 3-D, the image itself is in respectable shape but 3-D adds to the big-action fun. Audio quality is generally excellent and bonus features are informative while also giving some more meat for 3-D film fans to chew on. If you’re a 3-D fan, the 3-D Film Archive delivers another essential for the collection. Highly Recommended.

https://bluray.highdefdigest.com/91460/dynasty3d.html

 

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0165742/

In 1976, director Mei-Chun Chang was approached by producer Frank Wong to shoot back-to-back wuxia spectaculars Dynasty (Mandarin: Qian dao wan li zhu; lit: Chase after a thousand knives; aka: Super Dragon and Warlord) and Revenge of the Shogun Women (Mandarin: Shi shan nu ni; aka: 13 Golden Nuns) in Taiwan using a new single-strip 3D format called Super-Touch (later renamed Optimax III). They were the second and third of only six movies released in the format, which was invented by Michael Findlay, the director behind such exploitation classics as Shriek of the Mutilated (1974) and The Touch of Her Flesh (1967). Both of Chang’s films, but Dynasty in particular, are often connected to a short-lived ‘80s 3D resurgence that was officially kicked off by Ferdinando Baldi’s Comin’ At Ya! (1981) and followed through Joe Alves’ Jaws 3-D (1983), Steve Miner’s Friday the 13th Part III (1982), Richard Fleischer’s Amityville 3-D (aka: Amityville III: The Demon, 1983), and Baldi’s Treasure of the Four Crowns (1983). However, these two underseen martial arts epics pre-dated the fad and deserve some credit, along with Findlay’s quick & cheap new format, for laying the track that eventually led to the ‘80s boom.

https://www.genregrinder.com/post/dynasty-1977-blu-ray-review

1977’s Dynasty (aka Qian dao wan li zhu) brought the hard-hitting action of Asian cinema to audiences in three dimensions. Directed by Mei-Chun Chang (who also helmed Revenge of the Shogun Women the same year), this martial arts epic features a story about a prince who is accused of treason, and along with a young man out for revenge, must fight against the emperor’s deadliest forces. Utilizing the Super-Touch, or Optimax III, 3D system, it was the promise fulfilled by low budget filmmaker Michael Findlay, who had developed the system before his untimely death. This stereoscopic format filmed separate left and right images stacked on top of each other, which created two separate images within the same frame on the negative. It was temperamental with mixed results when it came to image quality, but produced excellent 3D images when in proper alignment….

Dynasty on Blu-ray 3D is another triumph for the folks from 3-D Film Archive, the true experts of not just this format, but other cinematic formats as well. It’s a wonderful release packed with three great presentations and engrossing extras. For those Blu-ray 3D enabled or otherwise, this one is a gem.

– Tim Salmons

https://www.kultcinema.ca/dynasty-1977-3d-blu-ray/

 

 

 

 

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